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Eavan Boland
Home | Eavan Boland--a Revolutionary for Feminism | It's a Woman's World | Themes | Works Cited | Interview on her latest work | Schmidt Interview | Achievements | Criticism | Author Biography | Thoughts on Eavan Boland | Time Period | Samples of Author's Works | The Pomegranate | Influential Factors | Pictures
Thoughts on Eavan Boland

 

            Eavan Boland is definitely an amazing and profound individual. She is not only a leading poet for Ireland, but she is also a spokeswoman for feminism by her encouragement of female writers to transcend above the obstacles of chauvinism and sexism. Consequently, she is not afraid to experiment with new plateaus of writing. This is exemplified through her choice of colloquial diction in her poems and choice of everyday topics such as family and the home. Likewise, she is not afraid to portray the realistic scenarios of life such as death, the wrath of Mother Nature, and despair. Boland portrays credible and emphatic characters that give her readers the urge to want and meet these characters.

            As a female writer in Ireland, Boland faced the conflict of expressing her autonomy and creativity while simultaneously supporting her nation, which includes the male-dominated culture. Accordingly, Boland was able to resolve the tension that she experienced between the dominant culture of male poet predecessors and her desire to express her identity. She wrote nationalistic literature in her own way which is evident in poems such as, Outside History and The Muse Mother (Hancock).  Thus, Boland confronted Ireland’s female nation and encouraged them to engage them to display their voices.

Boland’s ingenious use of imagery, symbolism, theme, and especially myth are presented in a plethora of variation in her publications. She views myth as a medium that makes a culture unique. By implementing Irish mythic culture within her poems, Boland is able to make her poems cherished and remembered forever, just like the nature of myths. Her common theme of encouraging women to transcend above sexist obstacles, which is evident in her poem, It’s a Woman’s World, vividly reinforces Boland’s urgent message for women to express themselves in literature, and reflects her own perspectives. Eavan Boland’s works portray the names of the forgotten, ignored, and oppressed, especially in Ireland. She boldly changes the image of female contributions to Irish poetry.



2004 by Janet Lam. All rights reserved